Guides The Iron Library

How to win with “toxic” players in your team

Editor’s note: Within gaming communities the term “toxicity” is usually used to describe harmful behaviour, negative attitude and/or overall rudeness. This article isn’t about “toxicity” in its classical meaning. Author introduces his own meaning to this term — which doesn’t take away much from this article’s usefulness.

  • Author: Viran
  • Topic: team coordination without communication tools
  • Level: Intermediate
  • Version: 2.9.3
  • Bonus points for: unconventional topic!

Most commonly known toxic players are the blamers and who trash talk their teamates so badly. But in War Robots, there’s no any means of communication, so how would toxicity exist here in our battlefield?

Disclaimer #1: All terms used here are self-termed.

Disclaimer #2: I might hurt your feelings while reading this, especially if you’re one of the toxic players.

Disclaimer #3: But don’t worry, I’ll detoxify you into a better player. I love detoxifying toxic players

Toxic as an adjective means very bad, unpleasant, or harmful. So who the toxic player is in our case?

  • Toxic player doesn’t read any guides for improving their gameplay in war robots (probably in any game they’re playing) so…
  • Toxic player doesn’t fully understand how the game works, and
  • Toxic player is the real noob. I mean it.

But do you know that you can win even with these players?

 

From here I’ll show you different species of the toxic players and discuss who they are and what to do with them. I hope, after reading these, you might realize something very important.

 

PART I: Barbarians

These are the blood lusted players whose motto are “killing is life” and “beacon running is for noobs”. And there are two subspecies of their race, the “herding barbarians” and the “solo barbarian”

Herding barbarians

Have you seen bunch of robots moving forward no matter what and how strong their enemy is? Wherever the 2 or more robots go, the barbarians follow them then 1 by 1 they’re being destroyed.

Consequence: Your team will be out of robots too early and probably no one will attempt to capture any beacon.

Solution #1: If you have already picked your robot, then go with them. Yeah, seriously. Support the one who’s in the very front until its last. Barbarians don’t stop shooting so probably they’ll destroy any opponent’s robot in front of them. Or you can kill steal their target if you have ammo by the moment. This time your goal is to eliminate robots as much your team can until it’s easy to capture beacons.

Solution #2: If you haven’t respawned by the game starts, then pick your worst robot, and then stay behind them. You may shoot or not, the herd will shoot and tank for you. Your goal is to capture the easiest beacon(s) and survive as long as you can while waiting for your enemy to ran out of robots. Once the time has come, pick your best beacon runner and capture as much as you can to turn the tables, or pick your most offensive robot to eliminate the remaining robots.

Solo barbarian

These are the ones who play Rambo-style rushing alone with his all might. If he’s rushing towards a herd of enemy, there are two solutions for you to decide. If that robot has a strong winning set-up, go and help, pick a role you both need, then later on both of you can conquer an area. But if the set-up is not enough to survive, leave that robot alone.

 

PART II: Stoners

Most of you call them campers, but they’re not. Campers are the ones equipped with sniping or Noricum-like weapons. Take note that they’re not toxic players, they have this role of field control and slowing down advancing troops. Learn to appreciate them.

Stoners are the ones who are disconnected or AFK, while some are just probably waiting for the right time to move.

Tip: It’s better not to pick and respawn while waiting for a significant signal to move on. Staying on one place like a post will make you an easy target to all types of weapons, especially distant rocket-type weapons. Also, not respawning immediately will make your opponents assume that they have already eliminated 1 hangar.

Solution: Stay with them, defend your team’s respawn area, then use them as bait or shield. Who doesn’t love hitting stationary target? As long as you’re moving they’ll probably hit the stoned robot and will ignore you.

 

PART III: Beacon snatchers

They already saw you reaching a beacon and they’ll still follow you to steal your capture even they won’t. This happens all the time. Most robots guilty with this are the lightweights and happens during the first seconds of the game.

Solution: Give them the beacon you’re heading to so they won’t waste their time following you as you productively using your time capturing another beacon.

 

PART IV: Dancers

The field is their dance floor! They just walk around aimlessly, not knowing what to do.

Solution #1: Hit them on their side where you want them to go to. This might stimulate them to turn and help them to decide where to go.

Solution #2: If solution #1 didn’t work within 3 seconds, leave them. You can barrage them with a full magazine and get not response at all.

 

PART V: SC y SF (So Close yet So Far)

An evolutionary type of dancers who’s dance floors are the margin zone of an uncaptured beacon.

Solution: If there are no other approaching teammates towards the uncaptured beacon, go there immediately no matter how far it is. But still, be careful wandering around the field.

 

PART VI: SF y SC (So Far yet So Close)

Have you ever seen a Magnum user hitting a target beyond 500 meters or more? Or any weapons hitting beyond their reach.

Solution: If they seem to be an effective set-up, help them to reach their range by supporting them. Both of you might conquer a zone. But if not, leave them.

Author’s note: Did you just realized that we all started as toxic players? Noobs are the detox-resistant players, so please, detoxify if possible. Remember, noobs blame noobs, pros help noobs.

“There’s a fine line between bravery and stupidity”

Juggernaut, Dota 2